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Abbreviations for Crocheting

 

Today's common abbreviations:

beg.............................begin(ning)
Bl(s)...........................back loops
ch(s)...........................chain(s)
Cl(s)...........................cluster(s)
dc...............................double crochet
dec.............................decrease
dtrc............................double triple crochet
fig..............................figure
Fl(s)...........................front loop(s)
hdc.............................half double crochet
lp(s)............................loop(s)
patt.............................pattern
prev............................previous
rem.............................remain(ing)
rep..............................repeat(ing)
rnd(s)..........................round(s)
sc................................single crochet
sk................................skip
sl.................................slip
sl st(s)..........................slip stitch(es)
sp(s)............................space(s)
st(s).............................stitch(es)
sp(s)............................space(s)
st(s).............................stitch(es)
tog...............................together
tr trc............................triple triple crochet
trc...............................triple crochet
YO..............................Yarn Over

* An asterick is used to mark the beginning of a portion of instructions to be worked more than once, "rep from * twice more" means after working the instructions following the asterick twice more means (3 times in all).

+ this identifies a portion of the pattern that will be repeated again later in the same row or round.

~ the number after this symbol at the end of row or round indicates the number of stitches you should have when row or round is completed.

( ) Parentheses are used to enclose instructions which should be worked the exzct number of times specified immediately following the parentheses, such as "( 2 sc in next dc, sc in next dc) twice." They are also used to set off and clarify a group of stitches that are to be worked all into the same space or stitch, such as " in next corner sp work (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc)."

[ ] Brackets and ( ) Parentheses are also used to provide additional information to clarify instructions.

Join- join with sl st unless otherwise specified.

Name That Stitch! Old abbrevations Guide

Are you experiencing difficulty in trying to stitch vintage crochet patterns that used the old-time stitch abbreviations (before the new standardized American abbreviations were implemented):

"Although I have been crocheting for more than 40 years, I have found older patterns to be a problem in trying to figure out the stitch abbreviations. I have been loaned some Elizabeth Hiddleson books (doilies mainly) by a friend and I have sometimes found the instructions very confusing because the stitch abbreviations are not listed in her booklets. I am wondering if you might know about the abbreviations that were used in the years 1901 through the 1920s?"

Many crocheters have encountered the same problem when trying to stitch patterns from old-time publications. Back then, pattern books and magazines didn't always include readily available stitch explanations.

Looking through some early twentieth century needlework and crochet publications, here are the designations for some of the most commonly used stitches, followed by today's designations:

Double crochet = today's single crochet
Half treble = today's half-double crochet
treble = today's double crochet
Double treble = today's treble crochet
Long treble = today's double-treble crochet

It might take a bit of time and effort to "translate" vintage patterns into today's crochet language, but so many of these beautiful designs are priceless and well worth the effort.